Dean's Lecture Series

University of Maryland School of Nursing Dean's Lecture Series header

2017-18 Dean's Lecture Series: 
Determinants of Health

Our four annual lectures in the Deans Lecture Series include:

The Virginia Lee Franklin Lecture
Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention: The Facts, The Myths, and the Gray Areas in Between
Oct. 18, 4 p.m.

The Millicent Geare Edmunds Lecture
The Impact of Social Determinants on the Health and Well-Being of Baltimore’s Communities
Oct. 26, 3 p.m.

The Ann Ottney Cain Lecture in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing
Details TBD

The Commander Lura Jane Emery Lecture
Details TBD

Upcoming Lectures: See More
There are currently no events for this period.

Lecture History and Past Webcasts:

The Ann Ottney Cain Lecture in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing

Dr. Ann Ottney Cain, professor emeritus at the University of Maryland School of Nursing, was a leader in psychiatric mental health nursing, specifically in family systems therapy. Her tenure at UMSON spanned more than three decades. Dr. Cain ultimately served as associate dean for graduate studies and research at UMSON. When she retired from the School of Nursing in 1994 after serving for 30 years on the faculty, her colleagues and students came together to create the Ann Ottney Cain Endowed Lecture in Psychiatric Nursing.

“I was overwhelmed. It was such a meaningful expression of high regard,” Cain recalled. “Psychiatric nursing was the first specialty offered in the Master of Science program at the School, beginning in 1954.” Cain says she loved working with graduate students at the School—“serving as teacher, mentor, advisor, and role model to them and to many other professionals in the field of mental health.”

Cain made a planned gift to further support the lectureship. “I did this because psychiatric nursing is a wonderful and challenging field,” she says, “and the lecture is a way of celebrating it on a yearly basis at a school of nursing with a long history of psychiatric nursing excellence. The lecture calls attention, in a very positive way, to the many contributions psychiatric nurses have made and currently make.”  

Watch past webcasts:

The Commander Lura Jane Emery Lecture

During her academic career at the School of Nursing in the late 1970’s, CMDR Lura Jane Emery, MS ’79, recognized a need for nurses with advanced education. This eventually led her to create the Lura Jane Emery Nursing seminars endowed fund.

Prior to attending the School, Emery had a long and successful career in the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps, where she served for 27 years. Upon retirement from the Naval Hospital in Annapolis, Md., she received credit for 30 years of service. Emery’s military career began in November 1947 when she started working as an Ensign at the U.S. Naval Hospital in Newport, R.I. After two years, she was transferred to the U.S. Naval Hospital, San Diego, Calif. She was subsequently ordered to duty on the U.S.S. Repose AH16 at Hunters Point, in San Francisco, Calif.  In 1950, Emery was called to Pusan, Korea; she spent the next 19 months caring for those injured in the Korean War. “As soon as I arrived there, I treated patients with smallpox, brain injuries, and missile wounds close to 20 hours a day,” she recalls. “It was a tremendous experience. The most memorable moment was when our ships were traveling up the river near Incheon with armed Chinese troops lining the banks.” Fortunately, she says, “When they saw the red crosses on the side of our ships, they dropped their guns—not one shot was fired. That was indeed a miracle.”   

When her military career ended, Emery wasn’t sure what her future would hold. “After I retired from the Navy in 1974, I felt lost, but becoming involved in nursing again helped ease the transition,” she says. She returned to Maryland and received her master’s degree from the School of Nursing in 1979. Each year, Emery’s fund supports a scholarly lecture presented. “When nurses have a good education,” she says, “they can easily advance in their field.”

The Millicent Geare Edmunds Lecture

The Millicent Geare Edmunds Fund was established January 6, 1964 by a bequest from Millicent Geare Edmunds, “to be expended for any purpose which will add to the comfort, morale, or education of the student classes and the faculty.” Ms. Edmunds was one of 12 students in the 1905 graduating class of what was then known as the Training School, University of Maryland. She served as the president of the School’s Alumni Association from 1920–1921 and on the General Committee of the 200th anniversary celebration of the City of Baltimore.

Watch past webcasts:

The Virginia Lee Franklin Lecture

D. Murray and Katherine Franklin created this endowed lecture in honor of their daughter Virginia Lee Franklin, BSN ’54, for the purpose of continuing her lifetime commitment to the education of registered nurses at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. Virginia Lee Franklin, affectionately referred to as “Lee” by her family and friends, earned a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Maryland School of Nursing and a master’s degree in nursing at Emory University. Her graduate studies and subsequent career focused on neurological and neurosurgical nursing. Ms. Franklin assumed a faculty role at the University of Delaware (UD) in the Department of Nursing. She remained at UD and was instrumental in its progression to a College of Nursing during her tenure. As a teacher and clinical instructor, Ms. Franklin was an active participant in the departments' curriculum development, its implementation, and its accreditation process. She is described as a dedicated professional who "continued to improve her knowledge of neurological and neurosurgical nursing and to develop expertise in nursing practice." She conducted workshops and seminars to disseminate the expanding knowledge and  science in this area as well as served as a consultant to the area Veterans Hospital and Queens Hospital in London.

Recognized by the American Association of Critical Care Nurses for her expertise in neurosurgical nursing and assisted in development of their Core Curriculum in Neurosurgical Nursing, which in 1981 served as the guide for the national Certification Examination for that specialty. At the time of her death in 1981, she was in the process of writing a text book on this topic.

Watch past webcasts: